Shades of Green E's Top Picks for Eco Sunglasses

Sunglasses are the latest accessory to go green, and they’re making a splash this summer with the use of materials like bamboo and recycled plastic. Try on these shades and you’re sure to see green in a whole new light.

Barbara Creations, Inc.

Barbara Creations’ ECO shades line of bamboo sunglasses ($20) are made with a combination of eco-friendly bamboo and “green metal,” a nickel-free, hypoallergenic material. The sunglasses are also hand-finished and affordable, and BCI partners with manufacturers that use sustainable practices whenever possible and donates 1% of its net proceeds from every ECOshades— product to the World Wildlife Fund. www.bcicorp.com.

Amy Sacks Eyewear and Accessories

Amy Sacks’ eco-friendly shades come in two sleek styles: Masa ($175) and Takeh ($230). With hand-carved,stained bamboo temples and a complementary acetate frame front, these stylish sunglasses are both lightweight and durable. Plus, customers can pick from a variety of colors from tangerine to tempura, all complete with 100% UV protection and a scratch-resistant coating. The company also offers a lifetime warranty and a generous return/exchange policy, and all of the company’s profits are donated to The Pixie Project, a nonprofit animal rescue organization in Portland, Oregon. www.amysacks.com; www.pixieproject.org.

Revo

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Revo Re-Use sunglasses ($159-$209) are molded from 100% top-grade recycled nylon plastic so they’ll make a big impact on your eyes, but not on the environment. The material gives the frames durability while keeping them lightweight and flexible. Plus, Revo’s polarized technology means that you”ll never be forced to squint, a particular plus for drivers. And Revo’s lenses contain an exclusive coating that rolls debris right off the surface, no tissue necessary. Frames come in black, silver or gray. www.revo.com.

Iwood

These oversized aviator-style glasses ($370) combine old-world craftsmanship with modern technology to create a super-cool set of shades that boast high quality and low environmental impact. They’re made in the U.S. of reclaimed, sustainably harvested wood certified by the Forest Stewardship Council, and are outfitted with 100% UVA/UVB protection. The frames come in a wide range of natural colors like ebony and teakwood, and they’re even hypoallergenic. Polarized lenses available upon request. www.iwoodecodesign.com.

MODO

Offering discerning design and craftsmanship, MODO sunglasses are perfect for the eco activist looking to make a statement. Earth Conscious Optics (ECO) frames ($85) contain 95% repurposed plastic and recycled stainless steel. Plus, for every frame sold, MODO will plant a tree to help restore wild areas. When it’s time for a new look, donate the old frames with an easy-to-use mail-in recycling kit and MODO will send them to people in need. www.ecooptics.com.

KAYU

KAYU’s handcrafted bamboo sunglasses ($180) are both environmentally and ethically sound—with each purchase KAYU funds one sight-restoring surgery in the developing world. The shades are made with bamboo that’s cultivated without the use of pesticides or fertilizers, and come in four different blonde wood styles. And, since bamboo can restore itself in as little as five years, eco-conscious customers will be relieved to know that their purchase will leave only a small environmental impact. www.kayudesign.com.

Oakley, Inc.

Oakley’s new Bob Burnquist Recycled Gascan° eyewear ($100), part of the Oakley Lifestyle Collection inspired by athletes, uses excess materials from other eyewear and accents its frames with bamboo icons. The super-hip shades even come wrapped in a bamboo storage bag. A portion of the proceeds from each sale is donated to the Action Sports Environmental Coalition, a nonprofit dedicated to promoting a sustainable lifestyle cofounded by pro skateboarder Burnquist in 2001. www.oakley.com.

 

Animal Rights National Conference 2018