Greenlighted

A review of Green Lighting: How Energy-Efficient Lighting Can Save You Energy and Money and Reduce Your Carbon Footprint by Brian Clark Howard, William J. Brinsky and Seth Leitman.
How much is there to know about green lighting? A book’s worth, as it turns out. Green Lighting: How Energy-Efficient Lighting Can Save You Energy and Money and Reduce Your Carbon Footprint (McGraw Hill Professional, $24.95) by Brian Clark Howard, William J. Brinsky and Seth Leitman takes a long look at the role lighting—a fairly overlooked aspect of most homes, unless the lightbulb’s out—plays in our lives. Howard is a former managing editor at E who is currently the Home and Eco-Tips Editor for online eco news site The Daily Green. Green Lighting comes in easy-to-digest bites, filled with facts and a few surprises. For instance, in a commercial building, lighting is responsible for 38% of electricity use. And when a company—like Starbucks which installed energy-efficient LED lighting in shops—does make a green switch, they improve their stock market performance, too. It’s not just about light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs). Other efficient lighting types include cold-cathode fluorescent lamps (CCFLs), which provide backlighting for LCD displays, and low-voltage lighting, lighting that operates at 30 volts or less and provides a lot more flexibility in design and location. The book covers fixtures, terms, recycling options, packaging and even a few history lessons.