Redwood Watch


To inspire the general public to become more interested in and aware of their local redwoods, Save the Redwoods created this iPhone app
Residents of the American Pacific Northwest walk among nature’s giants — the Coast redwood, Giant Sequoia and Dawn redwood trees. Coast redwoods are the tallest trees in the world with a height that can surpass a 30-floor skyscraper (320 feet) and can live for an incredible 2,000 years or more. The Save the Redwoods League, founded in 1918, calls standing at the base of a Coast redwood “one of life’s most humbling and amazing experiences.”

Giant Sequoia trunks can grow as wide as 30 feet or 10 paces by an average adult person. The trunk of Sequoia National Park’s General Sherman Tree is about 52,500 cubic feet, which is roughly equivalent to 21,800 150-pound humans! These trees can also live to be 3,000 years old – about the time of the Iron Age.


Dawn redwoods are smaller than the other two species of redwoods, but they have a unique story. In 1948, researchers supported in part by Save the Redwoods League traveled to China’s remote Shui-hsu Valley in south-central China. They found a few thousand trees growing in narrow canyons that opened into the wide valley. Rice and other crops were being cultivated in these lowlands; the researchers guessed that the valley was probably once covered with Dawn redwood forests. They collected cuttings and seeds and sent them to Asia, Europe and North America to be grown in public and private gardens, which is where you can enjoy them today.

This past February, donations to Save the Redwoods League and partners raised the funds to save an 11-acre “Enchanted Forest” of ancient, 500-year old redwood trees with twisted trunks and branches in California’s Mendocino County coast from being turned into lumber.

To inspire the general public to become more interested in and aware of their local redwoods, Save the Redwoods created the iPhone app “Redwood Watch.” It’s a free and fun tool for those living within redwood regions to post pictures of their redwood “observations.” The app is also nice for those who don’t live among the giants to find a kindred respect for the majestic trees in checking out the posted redwood photos and maps of their locations.