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  1. Friday Finds – 30th December | Campbells World
    January 3, 2017 @ 8:48 pm

    […] Europe’s percentage is higher, thanks to its abundance of artisan cheeses. All of the animal welfare issues that have come to light with respect to veal production apply to cheeses made with calf rennet because rennet and veal are two sides of the same industry. For the other 97% of U.S. cheeses, milk coagulation is accomplished with enzymes from one of two microbial sources, one of which is genetically modified and responsible for the vast majority of cheeses at the local grocery store. Many of these cheeses still contain animal derivatives in their fermentation process, except those that have been kosher-certified. Label Limits Cheese label ingredients will list “enzymes,” but it is rare that they will identify the enzyme’s source as animal or microbial. And they will almost certainly not specify when the microbial organism was genetically modified. So what do cheese labels tell us? If it’s labeled “kosher” and made in the U.S., the cheese was fermented without animal enzymes, though it may still contain milk from factory-farmed cows. Otherwise, only cheese labeled “vegan” has no animal ingredients. For greater insight, check the manufacturer’s website or call the company. Or consider the merits of faux cheese made from soy, almonds or rice, though you’ll still need to check to make sure it is casein (dairy)-free. After melting and taste-testing four top brands, the site veganbaking.net concluded that vegan cheddar and mozzarella shreds made primarily from tapioca or arrowroot flour combined with various oils from Daiya had both the flavor and melt-ability to stand up to their dairy counterparts. See more about Daiya here: http://daiyafoods.com/ Author: Trudy Hodenfield Writer for E magazine https://emagazine.com/the-cheese-challenge/ […]

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